PermaCycle

Rolling a tread between People and Permaculture

Philadelphia, PA: Heritage Farm

Leave a comment

If you thought that having a farm in a cemetery was an exciting way to use space, how about when a former  Methodist orphanage now social outreach center decides to turn their lawn space into a bustling farm? Too damn cool.

You know what’s cool? When the head farmer is practicing and applying permaculture design on their farm. Adrien of Heritage farm installed a fruit tree orchard which surrounds the garden beds on this 3 acre plot. Working with the topography of the land, Adrien used the natural  50 foot depression at the bottom of the hill for his benefit. This is where rain naturally runs off of the building and roads too. Utilizing this resource reduces their waste water and increases their productivity. The space is being used to cultivate mushrooms, but not in your ordinary run-of-the-mill-way. The farm receives from local mushroom farmers the mycelium activated sawdust. Mycelium being the roots of the mushroom, its fruit. These are discarded because after two  fruitings of producing mushrooms, a third fruiting is possible, but commercially unreliable. By looking to permaculture, Adrien is getting the most out of the land and boosts the farms opportunity for more income.

A bit of the 3 acre property

A bit of the 3 acre property

Evening farm shifts kick ass

Evening farm shifts kick ass

Adrien created this retractable roof to keep the area cool (it's a sheet!).

Adrien created this retractable roof to keep the area cool (it’s a sheet!).

More of the blocks.

More of the blocks.

These are the sawdust blocks inoculated with mycelium.

These are the sawdust blocks inoculated with mycelium.

This is the mushroom pit!

This is the mushroom pit!

Here we are planting  kale. We planted two rows.

Here we are planting kale. We planted two rows.

Meet Adrian.

Meet Adrian.

Here is a close up of the sawdust block

Here is a close up of the sawdust block

Fun fact about Adrien? His favorite vegetable is stinging nettles. He wild forages those bad boys, boils them for four minutes and enjoys them as is. How’s that for free fresh wild veggies?

 

To learn more about Heritage Farm go to: http://heritagefarmphiladelphia.org/

Advertisements

Author: zestyjazz

I'm a garden and a bicycle.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s